Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture at TATE Modern

Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture at TATE Modern

American sculptor Alexander Calder was a radical figure who pioneered kinetic sculpture, bringing movement to static objects.

BY BEA MARTIN

 

Calder travelled to Paris in the 1920s, having originally trained as an engineer, and by 1931 he had invented the mobile, a term coined by Duchamp to describe Calder’s sculptures which moved of their own accord.

Calder travelled to Paris in the 1920s, having originally trained as an engineer, and by 1931 he had invented the mobile, a term coined by Duchamp to describe Calder’s sculptures which moved of their own accord.

His dynamic works brought to life the avant-garde’s fascination with movement and brought sculpture into the fourth dimension.

 

Tate Modern: Exhibition /// 11 November 2015 – 3 April 2016 | London


More info at TATE Modern

 

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